The hunt of cyber threats using internet technology

Threat hunting is a complex task, but with the right tools and internet technology, it can make a huge difference to business security.

Threat hunting means actively looking for malware or attackers lurking on the network – and may have done so for quite some time. Cyber ​​criminals are always learning new tricks to bypass traditional defenses. They can quietly siphon off data, patiently search for confidential data, or work their way through the network to find credentials. Threat hunting differs from traditional threat management measures such as firewalls, intrusion detection systems, sandboxing, and security information and event management. All of these actions only conduct an investigation after an attack or security incident has triggered an alarm.

Understanding  the Persistent threat

Basic security measures and properly implemented anti-virus programs, firewalls, and other automated security tools should prevent the majority of threats from entering. Security experts assume that 80 percent of attacks are very simple and can be contained by standard security measures. The remaining 20 percent represent highly developed threats: They cannot be detected with program-controlled solutions alone. As soon as an attacker has sneaked into the network unnoticed, there are hardly any ways to stop them from lingering there. Studies show that cyber criminals spend an average of 190 days on a network before they are discovered – more than enough time to cause damage.

The hunt using internet technology for threats is based on the premise that the attackers are already in a company’s network and are secretly monitoring and scouring it. Threat hunting stops these attacks before they reach their targets by finding covert indicators of compromise. There are several benefits to threat hunting, some direct and some indirect. The direct advantages include a shorter dwell time for attackers, rapid detection and reaction to new malicious actions, and new detection methods. Indirect benefits include the exposure of rule violations, unpatched systems, risky user behavior, and potentially unknown attack surfaces in the environment.

Having an interest in hunting?

Here you can read more:

jakthandeln.se

The use of Camouflage and deceive

There are also other methods of hunting in internet technology : Fidelis Cybersecurity’s Elevate platform, for example, includes components for protecting endpoints and networks as well as a deception solution that can be used to monitor the behavior of cybercriminals and which also serves as a distraction . Deception lays out bait and dummies to attract hackers and automated malware. Instead of fishing in vain for the bad player in the ocean with good data, Deception delivers meaningful alarms and traffic analyzes. Modern Deception also offers fake access data with Active Directory entries and simulated access to company resources. This forms a compelling bogus network containing devices, data, and behaviors, all of which are used for attackers to pursue the bait. This allows defenders to recognize them, learn from them and defend themselves successfully.

Security systems are important to make collected metadata available for analysis across end-to-end relationships, to check alarms on end devices, to summarize alarms into conclusions, to provide complete processes between deception, endpoint and network for detection and investigation as well as to enable automated responses. In the case of stand-alone solutions, metadata is often not recorded and used. It is also up to the company to provide custom integration via interface. According to Fidelis Cybersecurity, customers can reduce a number of 40 to 50 security solutions to 10-15 systems through consolidation and integration.

Organizations should consider active tactics using internet technology in hunting threats.